Last updated on: 5/29/2009 | Author: ProCon.org

Center for Individual Freedom Biography

Position:
Pro to the question "Should the Words “under God” Be in the US Pledge of Allegiance?"
Reasoning:

“When you study the verbiage of the Pledge of Allegiance, it describes what the Republic is; pledging to a symbol, the flag. The rest describes the Republic; a nation that has always had within its beliefs, the belief in God. We do not say, ‘I pledge allegiance to God.’ We are pledging to a symbol, the flag, and the rest is describing what brought us to that symbol. That’s one of the points that we are trying to make in our brief. We have for many years shared this religious heritage and culture. It is not being forced upon anyone in the voluntary recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance. It simply describes what our country is built on: one Nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. We are built on the principles: indivisible, one nation and it has always been one Nation under God.”

The Florida Catholic, 2004

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
  Organizations/VIPs/Other
Individuals and organizations that do not fit into the other star categories.
Description:

“Founded in 1998, the Center for Individual Freedom is a non-partisan, non-profit organization with the mission to protect and defend individual freedoms and individual rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.”

Center for Individual Freedom website (accessed Aug. 14, 2007)

Mission:

“The Center seeks to focus public, legislative and judicial attention on the rule of law as embodied in the federal and state constitutions. Those fundamental documents both express and safeguard society’s commitment to individual freedom, not only through specific protections such as the Bill of Rights, but also through structural protections that constrain and disperse governmental authority.”

Center for Individual Freedom website (accessed Aug. 14, 2007)

Other:
Non-profit 501(c)(3)
Quoted in:
  1. Does the Phrase "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance Violate the First Amendment's Establishment Clause?
  2. Do the Words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance Improperly Endorse Religion?
  3. Is the Pledge of Allegiance a Religious Exercise?