Last updated on: 8/22/2007 | Author: ProCon.org

Joseph A. Zavaletta, JD Biography

Title:
Director of Center for Civic Engagement at the University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College (UTB/TSC)
Position:
Pro to the question "Should the Words “under God” Be in the US Pledge of Allegiance?"
Reasoning:

“I do support the words ‘under God’ in the Pledge of Allegiance. The American founders referred to God three times in the Declaration of Independence, the founding document of the United States.

  • First, they acknowledged God as Lawgiver in the ‘laws of Nature and Nature’s God.’
  • Second, they relied on God as Creator who had endowed men with the ‘inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.’
  • And third, the founders relied on God as the Supreme Judge of the World to judge the ‘rectitude of [their] intentions’ between the colonies and England.

The Pledge of Allegiance is a reference to God as Creator, not Redeemer, and does not establish a religion, but only an historical acknowledgement of His Providential role in the founding of America.”

Email to ProCon.org, June 29, 2005

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
    Experts
Individuals with JD's, or equivalent advanced degrees in fields relevant to government and constitutional law. Also top-level government officials (such as foreign leaders, US presidents, Founding Fathers, Supreme Court Justices, members of legislative bodies, cabinet members, military leaders, etc.) with positions relevant to government and constitutional law.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Director for the University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College (UTB/TSC) Center for Civic Engagement
  • Professor of Business Law, University of Texas at Brownsville
  • Former trial lawyer
  • Outstanding Educator of the Southern Academy of Legal Studies in Business
  • Chancellor’s Council Outstanding Teaching Award
Education:
  • JD, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA
  • MA, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA
  • BS, University of Texas at Austin
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Should the Words "under God" Be in the US Pledge of Allegiance?